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  • 09/07/18--06:23: Lawson Wood – part 3
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 & 2 also.

    This is part 3 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:


    Pre 1920s early works:


    "Goodbye, Sweetheart, Goodbye"
    postcard

    How to kiss the housemaid.
    postcard

    How to kiss your sweetheart.
     postcard

    "Lucky Dog."
    postcard

    Prehistoric Pastimes. "Football."
    postcard

    Suffrage postcard

    The Aberdonian doesn't see it!
    postcard

    The Baby and how to train it -
    Give it everything it cries for.
    postcard

    The Baby and how to train it -
    Let it get familiar with strangers.
    postcard

    The Baby and how to train it -
    Let it get plenty of fresh air.
    postcard

    The Bashful Man at the Ball
    postcard

    The Bashful Man at the Garden Party
    postcard

    The Bashful Man leaving the Theatre
    postcard

    The Bashful Man makes a Friendly Call
    postcard

    Untitled "Child and Ducks"
     watercolour

    "Where's your number?"
    postcard

    "You are in Danger of Losing a Friend, Write soon and All will be Well!"
     postcard


    A walk over.

    Bribery
    postcard

    Bulldogs
    postcard

    By the Doctor's orders.
    postcard

    Cold Sport

    Easy, father; easy, don't waggle your leg about so much or you'll Lose 'im!"
    postcard

    Exchange is no Robbery
    postcard

    Good morning! - There's something to crow about here.
    postcard

    Why We Crow About Felixstowe
    postcard

    Happy Hours at Christmas
    postcard

    Hot Stuff!
    postcard published by Salmon, Sevenoaks, Kent

    "If yer gimme a penny Guv'nor I wont split on yer!"
    postcard

    Is that measles?
    postcard

    Man. I'm having a g-r-r-and time
    postcard

    My Wife Doesn't know Where I am - Neither do I!
    postcard

    "Netjes Eten!" ( Eat Properly! )

    On the Starboard tack
    postcard

    "On the Tree Top."
    postcard

    Parking here for a while!
    postcard

    Put it in the Van, Sir?

    "Seems to me I've always loved you!"
     postcard

    The arm of the law.
    postcard

    The Measured Mile
    Gale & Polden post card series

    There's a long time of waiting!
    postcard

    Top Dog.
    postcard

    We don't think.
    postcard

    1920s Some nice things going on here.
    postcard

    1920s The Apple

    1921 I'm likely to hang on here a bit longer.
    postcard

    1921 Mural in a Canadian bungalow
    Photo by David Cubberley, owner.

    1922 Untitled "Too many apples"

    1923 "May I press you to a jelly?"
    postcard

    1923 "You're another!"
    postcard

    1923 Snookered!
    Advertisement for Booths Fireproof Doors

    1923 What - again!
    postcard

    1923 Why don't you write, you little monkey?
    postcard


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  • 09/10/18--05:47: Lawson Wood – part 4
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 3 also.

    This is part 4 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:



    1924 "Keep smiling." and life will be all bright spots.
    postcard

    1924 Left Luggage.

    1924 I can feel this "quiet spot" is doing me a world of good.
    postcard

    1924 It had to be you.
    postcard

    1924 My wonderful one!
    postcard

    1924 With lots of luck.
    postcard

    1924 You're a dear little beggar.
    postcard

    1924 Your note has just reached me.
    postcard

    1925c Mr. Prickles
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London

    1925c Mr. Pup
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London

    1925c Mr. Quack
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London

    1925c Mr. Trunk
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London

    1925c Mrs. Cackle
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London

    1926 First advances.
    postcard

    1926 The Scot 'Scotched'

    1928 Collier's magazine ( USA )
    May 12 1928

    1928 The Humorist August 4th 1928
    "Some Craft!"

    1929 Here's a flipper for you.
    postcard

    c1930 Porcelain 'Penguin' figurine

    1930s "It had to be you"
    postcard

    1930s Gran'pop Series Postcards:


    "Gran-pop" chats with the oldest inhabitant.postcard

    "Gran-pop" starts his Spring-Cleaning.postcard

    "Gran-pop" travels à la cartepostcard

    "Gran-pop" visits Loch Ness.postcard

    "Gran-pop's""Sole" catchpostcard

    "He wants to make the noises for the B.B.C."postcard

    "Step on it, Horace!"postcard

    "Where do we go from here?"postcard

    "Who's been eating my banana cuttings?"postcard

    "Who-me?"postcard

    "You lucky Guy, three Income Tax exemptions!"postcard

    1934 "The Lost Chord."postcard

    1935 Gran'pop floodlights for his Jubilee.postcard

    1935 Gran'pop Masonic postcard series Valentine & Sons Ltd:

    A "Brother" in distress.postcard

    Gran'pop discloses the secrets of Masonry.postcard

    Gran'pop receives the sign.postcard 

    Gran'pop's Lodge of Instruction.postcard

    1940s Gran'pop Gibraltar postcard series:


    "We're for it girls - the Fleet's arrived at Gibraltar!"postcard

    1940s YOU wanted to be an R.A.F. type at Gibraltar.postcard

    Air drop - "Rock ape reinforcements 1" - at Gibraltar.postcard

    The Spring Cruise at Gib. - An Atomic Submarine.postcard

    We do some skin diving at Gibraltar.postcard
    1955 A chance for chin-wag.postcard

    A "Hand off."postcard

    A little bit of luck for you!
    ( Voila une part de bonheur pour vous! )
    postcard

    A little persuasion is better than force!postcard

    A lover's knot.postcard

    A passing shower.postcard

    A wise man knows when to quit.

     postcard

    A wise man knows when to quit
    watercolour 36.8 x 33.6 cm
    published as a postcard ( see above ) by Valentine & Sons

    Ain't Daddy a big noise?postcard

    Another Glamour Girl.

    postcard


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  • 09/12/18--05:59: Lawson Wood – part 5
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape and the rest of the chimpanzee family were to bring him fame on both sides of the Atlantic. The Gran'pop's Annuals were a yearly excursion into comic absurdities that were popular around the world. 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 4 also.

    This is part 5 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:

    1930s Gran'pop Series Postcards continued from part 4:


    Convalescence.

    Dutch postcard: The moral of this print? Do not crack a note that you do not know.) 

    Dinner at 8.

    Dutch postcard: The world hints, the weather is getting better, leave all the burdens behind.

    Dutch postcard: When you're smart and powerful, just pull the longest end.

    Dutch postcard: Anyone who needs to lie down with flu does not have to say A after B.

    Dutch postcard: Who wants to tie love-knots, just hope.

    Dutch postcard; You can look long and wide, but one alone will not achieve anything.

    For health's sake - take things quietly.

    Giving him the works.

    Gran'pop as Queen of the May.

    Gran'pop believes in being air-minded.

    Gran'pop buys a pup.
    Grand Père a acheté une petite chienne.

    Gran'pop disapproves of the sun-bathers.

    Gran'pop does a bit of plumbing with his mate.

    Gran'pop floodlights for his jubilee.

    Gran'pop gives a cocktail party.

    Gran'pop gives a skating lesson.

    Gran'pop goes "Gliding" ( After joining the Air League ) postcard design
    watercolour and gouache 42.5 x 32.4 cm

    Gran'pop goes gliding.

    Gran'pop goes hiking.

    Gran'pop goes in for pearl fishing.

    Gran'pop goes modern and decorates his flat.

    Gran'pop goes Oxford.

    Gran'pop goes through the chair.

    Gran'pop has a little Scotch in him.

    Gran'pop likes being chiropped.

    Gran'pop looks in at the dentist.

    Gran'pop makes a jig-saw puzzle

    Gran'pop makes his hot cross buns.

    Gran'pop makes sure of his putt

    Gran'pop minds the baby.

    Gran'pop says - "'swat's happened?"

    Gran'pop says :- "You'll be missing this!"

    Gran'pop starts a band.

    Gran'pop says :- "This one's for you!"

    Gran'pop tests the swimming-bath water.

    Gran'pop tries a difficult shot.

    Gran'pop tries a Turkish bath.

    Gran'pop wants longer "odds."

    Gran'pop weighs in for The Derby.

    Gran'pop's bid for the Atlantic Blue Ribbon

    Gran'pop's shadow show.

    Gran'pop's view of the Leg-Theory.

    He Says he won't fly like a pheasant.

    It's a boy!

    Jump to it!

    Jump to it!

    Miss you badly at "Gib."

    My hat!

    Nothing wrong with his heart.


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  • 09/14/18--05:50: Lawson Wood – part 6
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape and the rest of the chimpanzee family were to bring him fame on both sides of the Atlantic. The Gran'pop's Annuals were a yearly excursion into comic absurdities that were popular around the world. 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 5 also.

    This is part 6 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:

    1930s Gran'pop Series Postcards continued from part 5:



    Percy is entered for the Point to Point.

    Physical Jerks.
    Culture physique.

    Physical Jerks
    watercolour and gouache on tinted paper
    43.2 x 31.7 cm

    Raising the wind.

    Say A-a-a-ah!

    "Step on it, Horace!"

    "Tell Mother it isn't worth it"

    The 19th "hole."

    The finishing touch.

    The last straw!
    Quelle couche!

    The Spring cruise at Gib.–
     An Atomic Submarine.

    Tough nuts.

    1930s Lawson Wood's Annual
    published by Dean

    1931c Lawson Wood's Fun Fair
    published by Arundel Prints, London

    1932 Collier's magazine
    November 12, 1932

    1932 Collier's magazine
    September 24, 1932

    1933 Collier's magazine
    July 15, 1933

    1933 Collier's magazine
    March 25, 1933

    1933 Collier's magazine
    September 16, 1933


    1933 The Old Nursery Rhymes
    published by Thomas Nelson and Sons

    1933 The Old Nursery Rhymes 
    published by Thomas Nelson and Sons

    1934 Gran'pop gets his own back after being left out of "The Sketch" beauty number, by holding his own beauty show
     watercolour and gouache 34.3 x 29.8 cm
    The Sketch 16 May 1934

    1934 The Sketch magazine cover
    September 1934

    1935 Collier's magazine
    July 1935

    1935c "Now," said Gran'pop, "all stand clear, this rocket's for the stratosphere."
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 27.9 cm
    1936 De Stad Panorama August 
    magazine cover

    1936 De Stad Panorama October
    magazine cover

    1936 Monkeys

    1937 Collier's magazine
    July 17, 1937

    1937 Collier's magazine
    May 1, 1937

    1937 De Stad Amsterdam magazine cover
    December 9 1937

    1937 Ons Land Panorama magazine cover
    May 27 1937 

    1938 Calendar
    Rich Chevrolet, Inc., Huntington, West VA

    1939 'S-Gravenhage in Beeld Panorama
    March 9 1939 magazine cover

    1939 Collier's magazine
    February 4, 1939

    1939 Collier's magazine
    September 30, 1939

    1939 De Stad Amsterdam Panorama
    July 1939 magazine cover


    Jeepers! Reapers
    1939 Illustrated magazine
    16 September 1939

    1939 Swinging it
    lithographic print

    1940 Collier's magazine
    April 27, 1940

    1940 Collier's magazine
    February 24, 1940

    c1940 Gran'pop's Annual
    published by Dean


    1941 Collier's magazine
    8, November 1941

    1941 Collier's magazine
    August 9, 1941

    1940s Calendar:


    A Pot Shot

    It's in the Bag

    Just a Little Squirt

    Let 'er Go

    No Wise Quacks, Please

    Soaking the Rich

    Something on the Ball

    Stealing His Stuff

    The Finishing Touches


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  • 09/17/18--06:03: Lawson Wood – part 7
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 6 also.

    This is part 7 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:


    1941-45 American WWII posters:


    1941-45 WWII poster
    Our Boys Aren't Kicking

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Bonds Buy Bombers to Blast the Bums

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Don't Horse Around

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Freedom Doesn't Grow on Trees

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Gentlemen Prefer Bonds

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Get Plenty of Sleep

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Keep Plugging

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Keep Secrets Under Cover

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Keep Your Chin Up

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Pass the Ammunition

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Shooting the Bull Won't Win the War

    1941-45 WWII poster
    Victory's Not on Ice Yet


    1942 Collier's magazine
    April 18 1942

    1942 Collier's magazine
    January 24 1942

    1943 Collier's magazine
    March 20 1943

    1943 Colliers magazine
    May 8 1943

    1945 Collier's magazine
    March 3 1945

    1945 Lawson Wood's Merry Monkeys
    published by Birn Brothers, London

    1946 Collier's magazine
    June 22 1946

    1946 Music and Moonlight
     Collier's magazine front cover 30 March 1946
    gouache on board

    1946 Music and Moonlight Collier's magazine
    March 30 1946

    1946 Poor Pork's been feeling poorly of late, more grit in his diet he's got to take
    watercolour and gouache 44.4 x 33.6 cm
    Lawson Wood "Mischief Makers" Birn Bros. 1946

    1946 Withholding Tax
    watercolour and gouache 38.7 x 30.5 cm
    design for an advertisement card for the Clapp Machinery Company, March 1946

    1947 Collier's magazine
    January 25 1947

    1947 Collier's magazine
    June 7 1947

    1947 Untitled "Mask"

    1949 Panorama magazine
    September 1949

    1950 Gran'pop's Annual
    published by Dean & Son

    1950s Don't Let Anybody Monkey With Your Car

    1950s Sunlight Soap advertisement postcard

    1950s Sunlight Soap advertisement postcard
    reverse


    1951c A Growing Business
    watercolour and gouache 37 x 30.5 cm

    1951c Fan Mail
    watercolour and gouache 40 x 30 cm

    1951c Logging Off
    watercolour and gouache 37 x 29.5 cm

    1951c Morning Delivery
    watercolour and gouache 40 x 31 cm

    1951c The Making Up Department
    watercolour and gouache 37 x 30.5 cm

    1951c The Shape of Things to Come
    watercolour and gouache 37 x 29 cm

    1952 Gran'pop's Annual
    published by Dean

    1952 Panorama magazine cover
    November 1952

    1953 Illustrated Family Journal
    November 24 - 16 June 1953

    1955 Playhour comic
    March 26 1955

    1957 Panorama magazine cover
    January 1957

    1957 Panorama magazine cover
    July 1957

    1957 Panorama magazine cover
    November 1957

    A Great Catch

    A Great Shame
    postcard

    A Penny Saved is a Penny Earned
    postcard

    A Warm Corner

    Advertising card ( U.S. )
    Hitting the High Spots

    Advertising card ( U.S. )
    Small Fry

    All for the love of a lady!
    Tout cela pour l'amour d'une femme!
    postcard

    All Scotch" No.6 "All Scotch thrift.
    A bag-pipe champion reducing his gas bill
    watercolour and gouache 35.6 x 25.4 cm



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  • 09/19/18--06:17: Lawson Wood – part 8
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape and the rest of the chimpanzee family were to bring him fame on both sides of the Atlantic. The Gran'pop's Annuals were a yearly excursion into comic absurdities that were popular around the world. 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 7 also.

    This is part 8 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:


    Bears postcards:


    "I'm making a great splash here!"

    1933c Boxing Bear

    Bearin' Guid Wishes: Hopin' ye'll be in the best o' spirits just like me!

    How long can it last?

    I've only just arrived.

    Ich freue mich herzlich. ( I am happy. )
     German postcard

    If you would take the hint and write
    I'd hug myself with sheer delight.

    Life ain't all honey!

    Washing powder advertising postcard

    You see I don't forget you.

    Your silence is hard to bear. 

    Cats and Kittens postcards:


    1920s You're lucky getting me.

    c1934 "And I didn't like the way she spoke about you!"

    1947 Here's Luck!

    Don't let the cat out of the bag.

    Gato preto e Ferradura, Dão felicidade e ventura.
    Portuguese postcard

    Here's to you - good luck!

    Hope You'll Strike it Lucky!

    I like your cheek.

    Só se eu tiver muito azar É que me chegas a apanhar.
    Portuguese postcard

    With a bit of luck things will soon look brighter!

    Chicks postcards:


    "Ladies first!"

    1923 It's lovely weather for the ducks!

    1925 Don't you think I'm rather a dear little thing?

    1925 My word you're coming out of your shell!

    c1925 From one little ducky to another.

    1933 Hope you'll "turn up" soon!

    Come and cheer us up!

    Herzliche Grüsse! ( Best Regards! )
    German postcard

    I'm busy helping mother!

    Na, - wie wär's? ( Well, how about? )
    German postcard

    Shall us? Let's!

    Deux jeunes amoureux.
    ( Two young lovers. )
    There's only you.

    Untitled

    Wie aus dem Ei gepellt.
    German postcard

    Your little bit of fluff.

    Dogs:


    A lucky cat.
    The "Lawson Wood" Series "Dog Humour"
    Raphael Tuck & Sons "Oilette" Postcard No. 8622

    By the Doctor's orders.
    The "Lawson Wood" Series "Dog Humour"
    Raphael Tuck & Sons "Oilette" Postcard No. 8622

    In disgrace.
     The "Lawson Wood" Series "Dog Humour"
    Raphael Tuck & Sons "Oilette" Postcard No. 8622

    "Look Before You Leap"

    Top Dog.
    The "Lawson Wood" Series "Dog Humour"
    Raphael Tuck & Sons "Oilette" Postcard No. 8622


    Dutch postcard
    Een oppas, zó, of omden bride, heeft absoluut een staart van node.
    ( A babysitter, like this or the bride, absolutely needs a tail. )

    Dutch postcard
    Een bok met een kater.
    ( A goat with a hangover ) 

    Feeding the Chickens

    Gran'pop Series
    published in America:


    A "Spring" Chicken
    watercolour and gouache on board 36.8 x 28.5 cm
    Cigarette card by Carreras

    A Booming Business

    Ain't She Sweet?

    An Eye to a Straight Deal
     watercolour and gouache 47 x 33.6 cm

    Any Way you Figure

    Bizziness Chart

    Blow this one-way traffic
    watercolour and gouache 40.6 x 31.7 cm

    Business as Usual

    Crime does not pay
    Calendar illustration

    continues in part 9...

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  • 09/21/18--06:24: Lawson Wood – part 9
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape and the rest of the chimpanzee family were to bring him fame on both sides of the Atlantic. The Gran'pop's Annuals were a yearly excursion into comic absurdities that were popular around the world. 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 8 also.

    This is part 9 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:


    Gran'pop Series
    published in America 
    continued from part 8:


    Crime does not pay

    Day Lumber Corporation for Victory

    Do it now!

    Getting a lift

    Getting a move on
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 28.5 cm

    Getting the hang of it ( The man on the flying trapeze )
    watercolour and gouache 36.2 x 27.9 cm

    Going our way?
    watercolour and gouache 35.6 x 30.5 cm

    Gran'pop ( title not found ) 

    Gran'pop ( title not found ) 

    Gran'pop at it again
    "It looks like a 'set-up'"
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    Gran'pop does the Hat Trick.

    Gran'pop feels the cold snap
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 29.2 cm

    First date

    Gran'pop fishing
    watercolour 42 x 32 cm

    Gran'pop is eighty-four
    watercolour and gouache 38.7 x 28.5 cm

    Gran'pop kicks the high spots!

    Gran'pop learns to knit

    Gran'pop on weighing scales
    watercolour 42 x 32 cm

    Gran'pop rises to make a speech,
    Whilst the waiter, manners would teach.

    Gran'pop sits on Jumbo's head,
    And paints the lamp-post green and red.

    Gran'pop still on top
    "Hang on! You'll soon be up!"
    watercolour gouache 37.5 x 30.5

    Gran'pop takes a Service Flat
    watercolour and gouache on board 27.5 x 28.5 cm

    Gran'pop tells a parlour story
    watercolour with gouache 43.8 x 33.6 cm

    Gran'pop tries a flu remedy
    watercolour, gouache and pencil 38.7 x 29.2 cm

    Gran'pop with a group of pigs
    watercolour 42 x 32 cm

    May the best man win

    Oh, my aching back
    Gran'pop's Annual
    watercolour and gouache with pen and ink 39.4 x 29.2 cm

    Here's to a bumper Xmas
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    In Conference

    It does things for you

    Late for the board meeting
    watercolour and gouache 27.5 x 29.8 cm

    Oh you flirt!
    watercolour and gouache 43.2 x 33 cm

    Panorama magazine
     "Opa Maakt Toilet"
    Gran'Pop does his toilet

    Popular Gran'pop by Lawson Wood

    Popular Gran'pop by Lawson Wood

    Popular Gran'pop by Lawson Wood
    "Gran'pop helps as you can see."

    Popular Gran'pop by Lawson Wood
    "Gran'pop paints the lamp-post green and red.

    Popular Gran'pop by Lawson Wood

    Porky and Chimp thought a swim would make them cool,
    and tried to dive into Gran'pop's drinking pool
    watercolour with gouache 44.4 x 34.2 cm

    Put your little foot out
    Advertising card for A C Motors, Cincinnati, Ohio

    Red Carpet

    Ride him Cowboy
    watercolour and gouache 43.8 x 33.6 cm

    Seems a bad year for shrimps
    watercolour and gouache 36.8 x 27.9 cm

    Swedish postcard
     "A mother is proud of little one, especially if it has become two"

    The 19th "Hole" inscribed "Gran'pop sticks to the rules"
    Design for a postcard
    watercolour and gouache with pencil on board 36.8 x 27.9 cm

    The Goldberg Collection of Images
    Issue Eleven

    The Musician
    watercolour and gouache on tinted paper 40.6 x 30.5 cm

    The Pump
    watercolour and gouache 36.8 x 28.5 cm

    The Tax Collector inscribed "The Collector calls for Gran'pop's Income Tax"
    watercolour and gouache on board 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    Untitled  ( Gran'pop Innuit )

    Untitled  ( Gran'pop Tailor )


    What about a clam-bake?
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    What's the depth of the Ocean?
    watercolour 38.1 x 30.5 cm
    published as a cigarette card by Argent Cigarettes

    When Pop papered the parlour
    watercolour and bodycolour 27.5 x 29.8 cm

    Why won't this one do?
    watercolour and gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm


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  • 09/25/18--05:47: Lawson Wood – part 10
  • Lawson Wood was born on 23 August 1878 in Highgate, London, the son of landscape artist Pinhorn Wood, and the grandson of architectural artist L.J. Wood. He studied at the Slade School of Fine Art, Heatherley's School of Fine Art and Frank Calderon's School of Animal Painting.
    Lawson Wood gained immense popularity with his humorous drawings of comic policemen, dinosaurs, prehistoric and Stone Age characters, and apes and monkeys often seen performing absurd antics against immaculate, dead-pan backgrounds. Eventually Gran'pop, the artful ginger ape and the rest of the chimpanzee family were to bring him fame on both sides of the Atlantic. The Gran'pop's Annuals were a yearly excursion into comic absurdities that were popular around the world. 

    For more information on Wood see part 1, and for earlier works, see parts 1 - 9 also.

    This is part 10 of a 10-part series on the works of Lawson Wood:


    Gran'pop Series
    published in America
    continued from part 9:


    Arrival of the newborn
    gouache 38.1 x 29.8 cm

    Broken Television Set
    gouache 39.4 x 30.5 cm

    Carol Singers
    gouache 38.1 x 29.2 cm

    Take your choice

    Fireman

    Interrupted Decorator
    gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    Interrupted Midnight Feast
    gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    Jumbo Cola Thief
    gouache 38.1 x 29.8 cm

    Latest Hairdo
    gouache 38.1 x 30.5 cm

    Photographer's Studio
    gouache 39.4 x 30.5 cm

    Rodeo, Big Prizes
    gouache on paper 39.4 x 30.5 cm

    Untitled
    "Gran'pop decorator"

    Various undated pieces:


    Her Service - Deuce

    Lawson Wood's Annual
    published by Dean & Son

    Lawson Wood's Annual 
    published by Dean & Son

    Learning New Tricks

    Little Bo-Peep has lost her Sheep

    London's Tramways poster "The Zoo"

    - making and Egg 'flip' -
    oil on board 53.3 x 39.4 cm including matting

    Nine Pints of the Law

    Sweep Your Snow, Ma'am?

    Some nice things going on here.
    postcard

    The Dinosaur Rush
    pen and ink and watercolour 33.6 x 24.8 cm

    The First

    The sleepy pair
    watercolour and gouache 36.8 x 28.5 cm

    The young idea "There's one over there on the left with four currants!"
    watercolour and gouache 35.6 x 25.4 cm

    There was a fat man of Bombay

    Tom he was a Piper's Son.

    Untitled "Cats"

    Untitled "Dancing pig"

    Untitled "Duck Hunter"

    Untitled "Kitten"

    Untitled "Kitten"

    Untitled "Maid"

    Untitled "Monkeys"

    Untitled "Scotsman"

    Dutch: "Wat is daar voor belachelÿks aan?"

    American advertising cards:


    "Put your little foot right out"
    A C Motors, Cincinnati, Ohio

    "Loading Zone"
    Bob McCormack Photographer

    "Bums Away"
    Edgar M. Cowan, Westfield, NY

    "Command performance"Edgar M. Cowan, Westfield, NY

    "Loading zone"Edgar M. Cowan, Westfield, NY

    "Pass the ammunition"Edgar M. Cowan, Westfield, NY

    "Surprise package"Edgar M. Cowan, Westfield, NY

    "The cold call"Edgar M. Cowan, Westfield, NY

    "Getting the Point"
    Edward  D. Maltby Co.

    "Ping-Pong!"
    Manor Cleaners, Oaklyn, New Jersey

    The Bridal "Shower"
    The Pockrandt Paint Co., St. Paul, Minnesota

    "Safety First"
    The Pockrandt Paint Co.


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  • 09/27/18--07:00: Peder Balke - part 1

  • The Norwegian landscape and marine painter Peder Balke (1804–1887) merged the Romantic movement's spiritual vein of naturalism with an expressiveness rarely equalled by his contemporaries. Born in humble circumstances in what was then a northern hinterland, Balke trained as an artisan before pursuing his aim to become an artist in the broader European tradition, which led to formative contacts with Caspar David Friedrich and Johan Christian Dahl. From the 1840s onward, Balke searched for ever more personal means to convey the wild beauty of Norway, producing dramatic, even hallucinatory paintings that reject conventional fine-art techniques in favour of radical simplifications of form and colour. Balke seems to have ceased painting after the 1870s, and he was essentially forgotten until the 20th century. In recent years, however, he’s been rediscovered by artists, collectors, and scholars alike.

    Born” Peter Andersen” on the island of Helgøya in Hedmark County, Norway. He grew up in Ringsaker, but lived in the 1820s on the Balke farm in Toten in Oppland County. Farmers in Toten paid for his education, and he decorated several farms in Toten in return. They actively encouraged his painting activities and later supported him in obtaining higher education.


    In the autumn of 1827, Balke served as an apprentice to Heinrich August Grosch. He was also a student at the Tegneskole under Grosch and Jacob Munch, Balke signed a two-year contract as an apprentice to the Danish decorator and artist Jens Funch. From autumn 1829 to spring 1833, he was a pupil of Carl Joham Fahlcrantz at the art academy in Stocholm. Balke was also a pupil of Johan Christian Dahl from 1843 to 1844.


    During the summer of 1830 he walked through Telemark, Rjukan, Vestfjorddalen through Røldal and Kinsarvik to the city of Bergen, and then back through Vossenvangen to Gudvangen, further over Filefjell to Valdres and then across the mountains to Hallingdal. Along the way, he painted and drew small sketches that were later developed into paintings. He also travelled to Germany, and Russia. He visited Paris and London.



    In Stockholm, he completed several of the paintings he had outlined on his 1832 Finnamark tour. Some of these were sold to the royal family. In 1846 he sold thirty of his paintings to Louis Philippe I of France for the Versailles Palace. Besides the 17 paintings in the National Gallery in Oslo, Peder Balke is also represented at several major art collections in Norway and Sweden.


    This is part 1 of 2-part post on the works of Peder Balke:


    1829c Christiania Viewed from Ekeberg

    1836 The Waterfall at Rjukan
    oil on canvas

    1840 Landscape with Mills and Rapids

    1840-49 c North Cape
    oil on canvas 94 x 123 cm
    Private Collection

    1840-49 Moonlit View of Trondheim
     oil on canvas 44 x 63 cm
    Private Collection

    1840-49c A Distant View of Mount Stetind
    oil on board 10.3 x 12.8 cm
    Private Collection

    1840-49c Ship in Breaking Waves
    oil on canvas 64.5 x 91 cm
    Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1840-49c The North Cape
    oil on cardboard 67.5 x 84 cm
    Nasjonalmuseet for Kunst, Arkitektur og Design, Oslo, Norway

    1840s The Jostedal Glacier
    oil on canvas 128 x 174 cm
    Göteborg Konstmuseum, Gothenburg, Norway

    1842 Moonlight on the Coast at Steigen
    oil on canvas 24 x 32.2 cm
    Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1843 Two Sailing Boats by Moonlight
    oil on canvas 8.5 x 13 cm

    1844-46c The Harbour at Skjervøy
    oil on paper laid down on cardboard 12 x 17.5 cm
    Private Collection

    1845 The North Cape
    oil on canvas 95 x 132 cm
    Nordnorsk Kunstmuseum

    1845-50c The Seven Sisters Mountain Range
    oil on panel 25 x 31 cm
    Private Collection

    1845c The Mountain Range 'Trolltindene'
    oil on canvas 30.8 x 41.9 cm
    Private Collection

    before 1847 Kielhomet Mountain at Stegen
    oil on cardboard 28 x 37 cm
    Louvre, Paris

    1847 The Seven Sisters
    oil on cardboard 28 x 37.6 cm
    Musée du Louvre, Paris

    1847 View of Hjelmso
    oil on cardboard 27.5 x 37 cm
    Musée du Louvre, Paris

    1847-49 Steigen
    oil on canvas 43 x 64.5 cm

    1847-49c Old Trees
    oil on paper laid down on cardboard 14 x 18.2 cm
    Private Collection

    1847-49c Steigen
     oil on paper laid down on cardboard 43 x 64.5 cm
    Private Collection

    1848 The North Cape by Moonlight
    oil on canvas 62 x 85 cm
     Private Collection, Oslo, Norway

    1848 The North Cape by Moonlight
    oil on canvas

    1849 Seascape
     oil on cardboard 35.4 x 44.8 cm
    Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden

    1850-55c Stormy Sea with a Steamer in Distress
    oil on paper laid down on canvas 33.5 x 42.5 cm
    Private Collection, Norway

    1850-59c Tree in a Wintery Forest
    oil on canvas 60 x 48 cm
    Private Collection

    1850-59c Vardøhus Fortress
    oil on canvas 92 x 104 cm
    Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1850c Moonlit View of Stockholm
    oil on canvas 67.3 x 100.3 cm

    1850c Mount Stetind, Northern Norway
    oil on paper 10.1 x 12.7 cm

    1850c Sami with Reindeer under the Midnight Sun
    oil on paper laid down on cardboard 18.5 x 26 cm
    © Northern Norway Art Museum, Tromsø

    1852 Fredrikshald
     oil on panel 22 x 28.5 cm
     Private Collection

    1855c Lighthouse on the Norwegian Coast
    oil on canvas 95 x 125 cm
    Trondheim Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1857-59 View of the Sarpsfoss Waterfalls, Norway
    oil on panel 21 x 28 cm
    Private Collection

    1860-62c The Tempest
    oil on wood panel 12 x 16.5 cm

    1860-69 Coastal Landscape with Wreck
    oil on copper 25 x 18 cm
    Nasjonalmuseet for Kunst, Arkitektur og Design, Oslo, Norway

    1860-69 Lighthouse on the Coast
    oil on cardboard 26 x 36 cm
    Nordnorsk Kunstmuseum, Tromsø, Norway


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  • 09/29/18--06:21: Peder Balke - part 2


  • The Norwegian landscape and marine painter Peder Balke (1804–1887) merged the Romantic movement's spiritual vein of naturalism with an expressiveness rarely equalled by his contemporaries. Born in humble circumstances in what was then a northern hinterland, Balke trained as an artisan before pursuing his aim to become an artist in the broader European tradition, which led to formative contacts with Caspar David Friedrich and Johan Christian Dahl. From the 1840s onward, Balke searched for ever more personal means to convey the wild beauty of Norway, producing dramatic, even hallucinatory paintings that reject conventional fine-art techniques in favour of radical simplifications of form and colour. Balke seems to have ceased painting after the 1870s, and he was essentially forgotten until the 20th century. In recent years, however, he’s been rediscovered by artists, collectors, and scholars alike.

    For more in formation on Peder Balke, and for earlier works, see part 1 also.

    This is part 2 of 2-part post on the works of Peder Balke:



    1860-69c Coastal Landscape
    oil on paper 33.5 x 25.5 cm
    Private Collection

    1860-69c Coastal Landscape with Ship
    oil on canvas 16 x 36 cm
    Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1860-69c Coastal Landscape with Wreck
    oil on paper laid down on fibreboard 34 x 52 cm
    Nasjonalmuseet for Kunst, Arkitektur og Design, Oslo, Norway

    1860-69c Mount Gausta
    oil on canvas 48.5 x 45 cm
     Private Collection

    1860-69c Nordland
    oil on canvas 61 x 72 cm
    Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, Sweden

    1860-69c North Cape
    oil on panel 21 x 24 cm
    Bergen Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1860-69c Sea and Fog
    oil on paper laid down on cardboard 34.5 x 26 cm
     Private Collection

    1860-69c Seascape
    oil on copper laid down on cardboard 16.8 x 23.2 cm
     Private Collection

    1860-69c The Old Bridge
    oil on panel 35 x 26 cm
     Private Collection

    1860-69c Waterfall
    oil on paper laid down on panel 11.5 x 8.5 cm
    National Gallery of Norway, Oslo

    1860-79c Coastal Landscape
    oil on panel 16.5 x 13 cm
    Private Collection

    1860-79c Seascape with Cliffs
    oil on panel 11.8 x 16.2 cm
    Private Collection

    1860-79c Steigen
    oil on paper laid down on panel 22.3 x 20.3 cm
     Private Collection

    1860-79c Stormy Sea
    oil on cardboard 13.4 x 17.3 cm 

    1860c Landscape from Finnmark
    oil on canvas 88.6 x 132.1 cm
    Private Collection

    1860s North Cape
    oil on paper laid down on cardboard 35.2 x 25.5 cm
    Nordnorsk Kunstmuseum, Tromsø

    1860s Seascape
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard
    Collection of Asbjorn Lunde

    1864 Fog over Stetind
    oil on canvas 71.5 x 58.5 cm
    National Gallery, Oslo, Norway

    1864 Mount Stetind with Birch
    oil on copper 71 x 58 cm
    Nasjonalmuseet for Kunst, Arkitektur og Design, Oslo, Norway

    1865 Lighthouse in Mist
    oil on canvas laid down on panel 71 x 58 cm
     Private Collection

    1870 Månelys

    1870 Northern Lights over Coastal Landscape

    1870 Vardøhus Fortress
    oil on canvas
    National Gallery, Oslo, Norway

    1870-79c North Cape
    oil on panel 124 x 152 cm
    Trondheim Kunstmuseum, Norway

    1870-79c Vardøhus Fortress
    oil on paper laid down on canvas 38 x 52 cm
     Private Collection

    1870c Stormy Sea
     8 x 11 cm
    National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway

    1870s Northern Lights
    oil on wood 10 x 12 cm
    The Hearn Family Trust

    1870s Ship in a Storm
    oil on composition board 8 x 12 cm
    The Hearn Family Trust

    1870s Ships in a Storm
    oil on wood 9.5 x 11.4 cm
    Collection of Mickey Cartin

    1874 Lighthouse
    oil on panel 12.5 x 17 cm
    Private Collection

    1887 The Northern Lights over Four Men in a Rowing Boat

    1950c Moonlit View of Stockholm
    oil on panel 67.3 x 100.3 cm
    Private Collection

    From Finnmark's Open Country
     95 x 123 cm
    Private Collection

    n.d. From Nordland
    oil on canvas mounted on masonite 61 x 72 cm
    National Museum of Art, Architecture and Design, Oslo, Norway

    n.d. Sailing in a Coastal Landscape

    n.d. The Northern Lights Route
    oil on panel 124 x 152 cm
     Trøndelag kunstgalleri, Trondheim


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    This series features illustrated children's books mainly from the Victorian era, more specifically from between 1850 and 1904. I found so many interesting books that I decided to split the series. 

    This first series (parts 1 - 11 was posted in July 2018) featured books from between the 1850s to 1881.
    These posts (parts 12 - 23) features books published between 1881 and 1904.


    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    Amid this trend, John Newbery (1713-1767), a London-based bookseller, took up full-fledged publication of books that were both "entertaining and useful" for children. A Little Pretty Pocket-book, published by Newbery in 1744, is said to be the first book that provided children with not only moral lessons but also entertainment. Newbery went on to publish numerous books for middle-class children in urban areas, whose number continued to increase. Newbery became well known in the United States as well; the most prestigious American award for children's literature is named after him - the John Newbery Medal, inaugurated in 1922.


    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 12 of an 23 - part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:


    1881c Three Wise Old Couples:

    Sassell, Petter, Galpin & Co.
    John Cassell (1817–1865) who was in turn a carpenter, temperance preacher, tea and coffee merchant, finally turned to publishing. His first publication was on 1 July 1848, a weekly newspaper called The Standard of Freedom advocating religious, political, and commercial freedom.The Working Man's Friend became another popular publication. In 1849 Cassell was dividing his time between his publishing and his grocery business. In 1851 his expanding interests led to his renting part of La Belle Sauvage, a London inn which had been a playhouse in Elizabethan times. The former inn was demolished in 1873 to make way for a railway viaduct, with the company building new premises behind. La Belle Sauvage was destroyed in 1941 by WWII bombing as well as many archives.

    Thomas Dixon Galpin, who came from Dorchester in Dorset and George William Petter who was born in Barnstaple in Devon were partners in a printing firm and on John Cassell's bankruptcy in June 1855 acquired the publishing company and Cassell's debts. Between 1855 and 1858 the printing firm operated as Petter and Galpin and their work was published by W. Kent & Co.


    John Cassell was relegated to being a junior partner after becoming insolvent in 1858, the firm being known as Cassell, Petter & Galpin.With the arrival of a new partner, Robert Turner, in 1878, it became Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Company. Galpin was the astute business manager.George Lock, the founder of Ward Lock, another publishing house, was Galpin's first cousin. Petter resigned in 1883 as a result of disagreement over publishing fiction, and in 1888 the company name was changed to Cassell & Co, Ltd, following Galpin's retirement and Petter's death.















































    1882 Fly-Away Fairies and Baby-Blossoms:


    E.P. Dutton & Co.

    In 1864, Dutton expanded to New York City, where it began publishing religious books. In 1906, Dutton made a deal with English publishing company J.M. Dentto be the American distributor of the Everyman’s Library series of classic literature reprints.

    John Macrae joined the company in 1885 as an office boy and in 1923 was named president. In 1928, the publishing and retail divisions were split into two separate businesses with Macrae acquiring the publishing side, operating as E. P. Dutton and Company, Inc.


    It published children's books under the Unicorn imprint, with some books published in the 1990s.  Dutton Children’s Books continues today.


















































    1882 Long John:
















    1882 Pippin Hill and Other Rhymes:


    McLoughlin Bros., Inc. was a New York publishing firm that pioneered the systematic use of colour printing technologies in children's books, particularly between 1858 and 1920. The firm's publications served to popularise illustrators including Thomas Nast, William Momberger, Justin H. Howard, Palmer Cox, and Ida Waugh. 

    The artistic and commercial roots of the McLoughlin firm were first developed by John McLoughlin, Jr. (1827-1905), who, as a teenager learned wood engraving and printing while working for Elton & Co. - a New York firm formed by his father John McLoughlin, Sr. and engraver/printer Robert H. Elton




























    1882 Rock A Bye Baby and Other Rhymes:

























    1882 The May Pole:


    Thomas de la Rue & Co. were founded in 1821 by Thomas de la Rue as a stationer and printer. By 1831 they were printing playing card under a Royal Warrant. By 1855 printing postage stamps, and by 1860, bank notes. The family sold their interests in the company in 1921. In 1991 the company became De La Rue PLC.

































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    The first section of this series (parts 1 - 11 was posted in July 2018) and featured books from between the 1850s to 1881.

    These posts (parts 12 - 23) features books published between 1881 and 1904.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    Amid this trend, John Newbery (1713-1767), a London-based bookseller, took up full-fledged publication of books that were both "entertaining and useful" for children. A Little Pretty Pocket-book, published by Newbery in 1744, is said to be the first book that provided children with not only moral lessons but also entertainment. Newbery went on to publish numerous books for middle-class children in urban areas, whose number continued to increase. Newbery became well known in the United States as well; the most prestigious American award for children's literature is named after him - the John Newbery Medal, inaugurated in 1922.


    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 13 of an 23 - part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:

    1882 The Glad Year Round for Boys and Girls:


    James R. Osgood (1836–1892) was an American publisher known for his involvement with the publishing company that would become Houghton Mifflin. 

    A reputed child prodigy, James Ripley Osgood knew Latin at the age of three and entered college at 12 years of age. He studied at Bowdoin College in Maine.

    He entered the publishing trade as a clerk in the Boston firm Ticknow and Fields and, by 1864, became a partner. It was reorganized in 1868 as Fields, Osgood, and Company. The firm inherited The Atlantic Monthly, as did James R. Osgood and Company, the firm created by Osgood and two remaining partners after Fields retired on New Year's Day 1871.

    Successful book publications by Osgood & Co. included Bret Harte’s The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Stories, followed by a volume of Harte's poems and another of "condensed novels". Osgood advanced Bret Harte $10,000 for future work, but Harte never wrote another story. In 1875, Osgood published Blanche Willis Howard’s One Summer, which became a best-selling novel.


    In 1878 the firm dissolved, and Osgood joined forces with Henry Oscar Houghtonto form the short-lived Houghton, Osgood & Company.



























































    1883 Blue & Red or the Discontented Lobster:


    The illustrator Richard André, born William Roger Snow on 6th March, 1834 was the eldest son of a prominent London family. He entered Cambridge University in 1854, but unknown minor infractions forced him to leave the university within the year. In 1855, after spending his large inheritance, Snow joined the army and travelled the world. He published his first work in 1860. Titled Sketches of Chinese Life & Character, it was based on his observations and experiences while living in Hong Kong. By the early 1870s, Snow had become a playwright. By 1875, both his marriage and his military career came to an abrupt end as a result of his infidelities, causing him to assume an alias. 
    Working as Clifford Merton, Snow began a prolific career as a writer and illustrator of children’s literature until his abandoned wife discovered his alias. After their divorce, Snow changed his name again. Thereafter known as Richard André he collaborated with the children’s author Juliana Horatia Ewing, his success as an illustrator continued on after Ewing’s death in 1885. André eventually branched out into photography and printing and became a successful businessman. He died in 1907 at the age of seventy five.

























































    1883 Play Hours and Play Time:








































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    The first section of this series (parts 1 - 11 was posted in July 2018) and featured books from between the 1850s to 1881.


    These posts (parts 12 - 23) features books published between 1881 and 1904.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    Amid this trend, John Newbery (1713-1767), a London-based bookseller, took up full-fledged publication of books that were both "entertaining and useful" for children. A Little Pretty Pocket-book, published by Newbery in 1744, is said to be the first book that provided children with not only moral lessons but also entertainment. Newbery went on to publish numerous books for middle-class children in urban areas, whose number continued to increase. Newbery became well known in the United States as well; the most prestigious American award for children's literature is named after him - the John Newbery Medal, inaugurated in 1922.
    This is part 14 of an 23 - part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:

    c1881 Told in the Twilights
    illustrated by Mary Ellen Edwards and John Charles Staples:

    Mary Ellen Edwards c1863
    albumen print and paint

    Mary Ellen Edwards ( 9 November 1838 – 22 December 1934 ) was born the daughter of Mary Johnson and Downes Edwards, a farmer and engineer who had a number of successful inventions. She was born on her father’s farm in Surbiton, London. She came from an artistic family. Her uncle was E. Killingworth Johnson and her mother's uncle was James Wright, both Members of the Society of Painters in Water Colours.
    She spent her early years with her family in Surbiton, the Isle of Man, South Kensington, and Chelsea, London.

    On 13 June 1866, Edwards married John Freer. Freer worked for the Peninsular and Oriental Company, a steam navigation service. Edwards and Freer had one son, John E. L. Freer, born in 1867. Edward's first husband ( Freer ) died in 1869. At this time and over the following decade Mary Ellen was submitting her work to the annual Royal Academy exhibitions.

    In 1872 she married the artist John Charles Staples, with whom she worked on many projects until his death at the end of the century.























































































    1884 Make-Believe & Reality 
    illustrated by Richard Andre (pseudonym of William Roger Snow):




















































    1884 Museum of Wonders 
    illustrated by Frederick Burr Opper:


    Frederick Burr Opper ( 2 January 1857 – 28 August 1937) is regarded as one of the pioneers of American newspaper comic strips, best known for his comic strip “Happy Hooligan.” His comic characters were featured in magazinespolitical cartoons, and comic strips for six decades.

    Born to Austrian-American immigrants Lewis and Aurelia Burr Oppers in Madison, Ohio, Frederick was the eldest of three children. At the age of 14, he dropped out of public school to work as a printer's apprentice at the local “Madison Gazette,” and at 16, he moved to New York City where he worked in a store and continued to draw. He studied briefly at Cooper Union, followed by a short stint as pupil and assistant to illustrator Frank Beard.


    Opper's first cartoon was published in “Wild Oats” in 1876, followed by cartoons and illustrations in “Scribner’s Monthly” and “St. Nicholas Magazine.” He worked as illustrator at “Frank Leslie's Weekly” from 1877 to 1880. Opper was then hired to draw for Puck by publishers Joseph Keppler and Adolph Schwarzmann. He stayed with Puck for 18 years, drawing everything from spot illustrations to chromolithograph covers.





















































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    The first section of this series (parts 1 - 11 was posted in July 2018) and featured books from between the 1850s to 1881.


    These posts (parts 12 - 23) features books published between 1881 and 1904.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    Amid this trend, John Newbery (1713-1767), a London-based bookseller, took up full-fledged publication of books that were both "entertaining and useful" for children. A Little Pretty Pocket-book, published by Newbery in 1744, is said to be the first book that provided children with not only moral lessons but also entertainment. Newbery went on to publish numerous books for middle-class children in urban areas, whose number continued to increase. Newbery became well known in the United States as well; the most prestigious American award for children's literature is named after him - the John Newbery Medal, inaugurated in 1922.
    This is part 15 of an 23 - part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:

    1884 The Magic Ring:
    The Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK) is the oldest Anglican mission organisation, and the leading publisher of Christian books in the United Kingdom. It was founded in 1698 by Thomas Bray , (an Anglican priest), and a small group of friends, including Lord Guilford, Sir Humphrey Mackworth, Mr Justice Hooke, and Colonel Maynard Colchester. The emphasis was on setting up schools, and the SPCK was a major factor in setting up church schools across Britain. Today, the SPCK is most widely known for its publishing of Christian books.
    The Society was founded to encourage Christian education and the production and distribution of Christian literature. SPCK has always sought to find ways to communicate the basic principles of the Christian faith to a wider audience, both in Britain and overseas. A related Scottish society was founded in 1709. It sent missions to Scotland's Highlands, and a handful to Indians in the American colonies.


    SPCK's early publications were distributed through a network of supporters who received books and tracts to sell or give away in their own localities. Large quantities of Christian literature were provided for the Navy, and the Society actively encouraged the formation of parish libraries, to help both clergy and laity.















































    1884 The Princess Nobody A Tale of Fairyland illustrated by Richard Doyle:


    Richard "Dickie" Doyle 1824-1883

    Richard "Dickie" Doyle ( 18 September 1824 – 10 December 1883 ) was a notable illustrator of the Victorian era. His work frequently appeared, amongst other places, in Punch magazine;  he drew the cover of the first issue, and designed the magazine's masthead, a design that was used for over a century.

    Born at 17 Cambridge Terrace, London, one of seven children of Irish cartoonist John Doyle, a noted political caricaturist. Doyle had three who were also artists. The young Doyle had no formal art training other than his father's studio, but from an early age displayed a gifted ability to depict scenes of the fantastic and grotesque. Throughout his life he was fascinated by fairy tales. He produced his first complete illustrated book,Home for the Holidays” when he was twelve; it was published posthumously in 1887. 

    A Richard Doyle cover for Punch magazine

    He joined the staff of Punch magazine  in 1843 aged 19, remaining there for seven years. He was the uncle of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, author of the Sherlock Holmes stories.









    Longmans, the world's oldest commercial publishing imprint, was originally founded in London by Thomas Longman in 1724. Longman himself was one of the six booksellers who undertook the responsibility of Samuel Johnson's Dictionary (1746-55). With Longman's death in 1755, his nephew, Thomas Longman, became the sole proprietor of the company and greatly extended its colonial trade. Longman published the works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Southey, and Scott, and acts a London agent for the Edinburgh Review.


    With the admittance of multiple new partners by 1823, the title of the firm was changed to Longman, Hurst Rees, Orme, Brown & Green. In 1968, Longman was acquired by the global publisher Pearson, owner of Penguin, and The Financial Times, yet the company remained primarily in family control until 1972. Longman continued to exist as an imprint of Pearson, under the name Pearson Longman, but is now primarily used by Pearson's ELT (English Language Teaching) business.

































































    1885 At Home:



















































    1885 Aunt Louisa's Nursery Book:



























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    The first section of this series (parts 1 - 11 was posted in July 2018) and featured books from between the 1850s to 1881.


    These posts (parts 12 - 23) features books published between 1881 and 1904.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    Amid this trend, John Newbery (1713-1767), a London-based bookseller, took up full-fledged publication of books that were both "entertaining and useful" for children. A Little Pretty Pocket-book, published by Newbery in 1744, is said to be the first book that provided children with not only moral lessons but also entertainment. Newbery went on to publish numerous books for middle-class children in urban areas, whose number continued to increase. Newbery became well known in the United States as well; the most prestigious American award for children's literature is named after him - the John Newbery Medal, inaugurated in 1922.
    This is part 16 of an 23 - part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:


    1885 Dame Crump: