Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

Named "A Blog of Note" by Google

older | 1 | .... | 43 | 44 | (Page 45) | 46 | 47 | 48 | newer

    0 0

    This series features illustrated children's books mainly from the Victorian era, more specifically from between 1850 and 1904. I found so many interesting books that I decided to split the series. 

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.

    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 5 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1872 Grammar in Rhyme
    published by George Routledge & Sons, London:





























    1873 Aunt Louisa's Holiday Guest:





    Aunt Louisa's Holiday Guest

    Dame Trot and her Cat

    Dame Trot and her Cat

    Dame Trot and her Cat

    Dame Trot and her Cat

    The Good Children

    The Good Children

    The Good Children

    The Good Children

    Bruin the Bear

    Bruin the Bear

    Bruin the Bear

    Bruin the Bear

    Home for the Holidays

    Home for the Holidays

    Home for the Holidays

    1873 Routledge's Nursery Tales
    published by George Routledge & Sons, London:


    The Three Bears

    The Three Bears

    The Three Bears

    The Three Bears

    The Three Bears

    The Three Bears

    Little Red Riding Hood

    Little Red Riding Hood

    Little Red Riding Hood

    Little Red Riding Hood

    Little Red Riding Hood

    1875 Aladdin or The Wonderful Lamp by Walter Crane
    published by George Routledge & Sons, London and New York:


    Walter Crane (15 August 1845 – 14 March 1915) was an English artist and book illustrator. He is considered to be the most influential, and among the most prolific, children’s book creator of his generationand, along with Randolph Caldecott and Kate Greenaway, one of the strongest contributors to the child's nursery motif that the genre of English children's illustrated literature would exhibit in its developmental stages in the latter 19th century.

    Crane's work featured some of the more colourful and detailed beginnings of the child-in-the-garden motifs that would characterise many nursery rhymes and children's stories for decades to come. He was part of the Arts and Crafts movement and produced an array of paintings, illustrations, children's books, ceramic tiles and other decorative arts. Crane is also remembered for his creation of a number of iconic images associated with the international Socialist movement.





















    1875 Cock Robin
    published by McLoughlin Bros., New York:




















    1875 Little Bo Peep
    published by McLoughlin Bros., New York:





















    0 0

    This series features illustrated children's books mainly from the Victorian era, more specifically from between 1850 and 1904. I found so many interesting books that I decided to split the series. 

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.

    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 6 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1875 Little Boy Blue
    published by Marcus Ward & Co. Ltd., 
    London, Belfast, and New York:


    Marcus Ward and Co. was a British publishing company known for its illustrated books for children and adults, as well as its decorative greeting cards.


    It had its beginnings in 1802, with a partnership between John Ward, James Blow and Robert Greenfield. By the 1820s they owned paper mills in Belfast, Comber and Coleraine,  which operated under the company name of John Ward and Sons. In the early 1830s Marcus Ward (son of John Ward) took over the running of the Belfast paper mill. Then in 1833 Marcus formed a new company, Marcus Ward & Sons, based in Belfast, having a new direction, in stationery and general publishing. Marcus Ward and Sons soon became very successful in the area of colour lithography, winning a medal at the Great Exhibition of 1851. By the time Marcus died in 1847 his three sons, Francis, William and John, had successfully taken over the running of the business.





































    1875 The Three Little Crows
    published by McLoughlin Brothers, New York:








    The Morning Call


    The Result of Disobedience


    Wicked, naughty, dying Bill


    Charley looked on and laughed, I know


    The Parting.

    1877 A Queer Carriage
    published by D. Lothrop & Co., Boston, Mass:


    In 1850 Daniel Lothrop bought out a book store in Dover, New Hampshire, which he made one of the best and largest in New Englandand it became a literary centre: a favourite meeting-place for the cultivated people of the town.

    By 1868, Lothrop was ready to concentrate his forces upon the broader accomplishment of his life purpose of publishing literature for the people, and especially for children and youth. He then transferred his publishing work to Boston, Massachusetts.


    He instituted a new and distinct literature for children, publishing it under much discouragement until it became a great success and brought him the title of the "children's friend." He was eminently successful in elevating the standard of literature for the Sunday-school, for young people and for the home, always carrying out his first expressed purpose "never to publish a work simply sensational, no matter what chances of money it has in it, and to publish books that will make true, steadfast growth in right living—not alone right thinking, but right living."



































    1877 My Pet Book
    published by J.B. Lippincott & Co., Philadelphia, PA:


    J. B. Lippincott & Co. was an American publishing house founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1836 by Joshua B. Lippincott. Joshua Lippincott's company began by selling Bibles and other religious works then successfully expanded into trade books, which became the largest portion of the business. In 1849, Lippincott acquired Grigg, Elliot & Co., a major book distribution company. The acquisition helped make the company one of the largest publishers in the United States. In the 1950s the company began producing a successful line of medical and nursing books and journals. The company was sold to Harper & Row in 1978 but Joshua Lippincott's great-grandson Joseph Wharton Lippincott, Jr. remained on the Board of Directors until 1987. In 1990, the company was acquired by Wolters Kluwer, who merged it with Raven Publishers and then with Williams & Wilkins to form Lippincott Williams & Wilkins in 1998.









    1877 The Marriage of the Three Little Kittens
    published by McLoughlin Brothers, New York:




























    1878 The Picture Gift Book
    Published by S.W. Partridge & Co, T. Nelson & Sons:




































    0 0

    This series features illustrated children's books mainly from the Victorian era, more specifically from between 1850 and 1904. I found so many interesting books that I decided to split the series. 

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.

    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 7 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1878 My Mothers Picture Book:






































































    1879 Merry Elves
    published by Seeley, Jackson, & Halliday, London:












































































    1879 The Children's Posy
    published by Thomas Nelson & Sons, London, Edinburgh and New York:


    Thomas Nelson is a publishing firm that began in West Bow, Edinburgh,  Scotland in 1798 as the namesake of its founder. It is a subsidiary of Harper Collins, the publishing unit of News Corp. In Canada, the Nelson imprint is used for educational publishing. In the United Kingdom, it was a mainstream publisher until the late 20th century, and later became part of the educational imprint Nelson Thornes. 

    Thomas Nelson, Sr. founded the shop that bears his name in Edinburgh in 1798, originally as a second-hand bookshop. The firm became a publisher of new books and, as the 19th century progressed, it produced an increasingly wide range of non-religious materials; by 1881, religion accounted for less than 6% of the firm's output. In 1835 the shop became a company, first as Thomas Nelson & Son when William joined, and in 1839 became Thomas Nelson & Sons when Thomas Jr. entered the business. 


    William Nelson died in 1887, and Thomas Jr. died in 1892. They were succeeded by George Brown, Thomas’s nephew, who directed the company until Thomas III and Ian, Thomas Jr.'s sons, joined him and John Buchan as partners. Buchan, employed by the firm until 1929, dedicated his novel The Thirty Nine Steps to Thomas III (Thomas Arthur Nelson) in 1914.


























    1879 The Gem of All Picture Books
    published by The American News Company, New York:


    The American News Company was a magazine, newspaper, book, comic book, and postcard distribution company founded in New York City in 1864 by Sinclair Tousey (1818–1887). The company distributed exclusively through its national network of more than three hundred affiliated news agencies and dominated the distribution market in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. The company closed in 1957. In addition to distributing postcards, the company seems to have published and printed postcards as well and served as an intermediary for the publishing of postcards for smaller publishers. Most of the postcards were printed in Germany before the First World War and thereafter in America and France.





























    0 0

    This series features illustrated children's books mainly from the Victorian era, more specifically from between 1850 and 1904. I found so many interesting books that I decided to split the series. 

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.

    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 8 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1880 Afternoon Tea by J.G. Sowerby & H.H. Emmerson
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London:


    Henry Hetherington Emmerson ( 11 November 1831 – 28 August 1895 ) commonly known by his initials H. H. Emmerson, was an English painter and illustrator.



    Emmerson was born in Chester-le-Street in 1831. At the age of 13, he went to Newcastle, where he studied painting and engraving under William Bell Scott at the Government School of Art. After some two and a half years under Scott's tutelage, Emmerson was sent to Paris to study for six months as the beneficiary of a clergyman who had taken interest in his work. After his return, he was accepted into the Royal Academy in London.

    Emmerson also provided illustrations to children's books, including “Afternoon Tea” ( 1880 ) and “The May Blossom” ( 1881 ). “Afternoon Tea,” although well received by reviewers attracted a bit of controversy, as some claimed it was a cheap derivative of “Under the Window,” a popular 1879 book by Kate Greenaway. 


    Greenaway herself considered the book "blatant piracy", while Sowerby argued the illustrations were not imitations but merely in the same genre.























































































































    1880 Baby's Birthday and How it Was Spent
    published by Porter & Coates, Philadelphia, PA:


    Porter & Coates. In 1848, Robert Porter and Charles Davis founded Davis & Porter Company, a Philadelphia firm specialising in the printing of trade and art books. When Henry Coates joined the firm in 1867, it was renamed Davis, Porter & Coates. Davis retired in 1867 and the firm was renamed Porter & Coates. In 1869, G. Morrison Coates, brother of Henry Coates, joined the firm. 1895, founder Robert Porter retired, and the firm became Henry T. Coates & Co. The company became famous for creating Home and Garden magazine and publishing the Horatio Alger Junior titles. In 1904, Coates retired and sold the company to John C. Winston.




























    1880 Clever Hans by the Brothers Grimm
    illustrated by J. Lawson
    published by Thomas de la Rue & Co., London:

    John Lawson (born 1838 Dunfermline, Fife, Scotlanddied 13 July 1908 London).

    Though he worked variously as a painter, sculptor and stained glass designer, John Lawson is best remembered as an illustrator of books and periodicals. His early, predominantly black and white, images mark him out as one of that striking generation of the ‘Illustrators of the Sixties’, and relate to those by his fellow Scotsman, Joseph Noel Paton, who is likely to have been a close friend. However, his later colour plates reveal his ability to adapt to a new market for popular children’s books and annuals, and so work alongside his eldest daughter, Lizzie Mack.


    Nothing is known of Lawson’s education, and he is first appears as an artist when he begins to exhibit works at the Royal Scottish Academy in 1857. By 1861 Lawson was describing himself as a ‘glass stainer’s designer.’ However, soon after 1863, by which time he was living at 31 Dean Street, Lawson also established himself as an illustrator, initially working mainly with the Edinburgh publisher, William P Nimmo, and also contributing to periodicals, including Once a Week and The Quiver, both published in London.


    By 1881, both Lawson and his eldest child, Elizabeth, were working as artists from 23 Glebe Place, Chelsea. Gaining a reputation as an illustrator of children’s books by the early 1880s, Lizzie Lawson married the writer and editor, Robert Ellice Mack, in September 1886, who would become Director of the London office of the publisher, Nister, in 1888. At various times, she and her husband worked both together and with her father.





    Thomas de la Rue & Co. were founded in 1821 by Thomas de la Rue as a stationer and printer. By 1831 they were printing playing card under a Royal Warrant. By 1855 printing postage stamps, and by 1860, bank notes. The family sold their interests in the company in 1921. In 1991 the company became De La Rue PLC.























    1880 Grandmother Puss or The Grateful Mouse
    published by McLoughlin Brothers, New York:












    0 0

    This series features illustrated children's books mainly from the Victorian era, more specifically from between 1850 and 1904. I found so many interesting books that I decided to split the series. 

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.

    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 9 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1880 Launch the Lifeboat! by Mrs. O.F. Walton
    drawings by H.J. Rhodes
    published by The Religious Tract Society, London:


    The Religious Tract Society, founded 1799, 56 Paternoster Row and 65 St. Paul's Chuchyard and 164 Piccadilly, London, was the original name of a major British publisher of Christian literature intended initially for evangelism, and including literature aimed at children, women, and the poor.The RTS is also notable for being the publisher of the “Boy’s Own Paper,” “Girl’s Own Paper” and “The Leisure Hour.”

    The society started by publishing tracts, but rapidly expanded their work into the production of books and periodicals. Their books were mostly small but did include larger works such as the multi-volume Devotional Commentary and the massive Analytical Concordance to the Bible of Robert Young. From the 1860s, the Society began publishing novels aimed at women and children, providing a platform for a new generation of women writers.


    In 1935 the RTS merged with the Christian Literature Society for India and Africa to form the United Society for Christian Literature (USCL). In 1931, there was a change of imprint to Lutterworth Press for all RTS publications intended for the home market.






































    1880 Pretty Peggy and Other Ballads 
    illustrated by Rosina Emmet
    published by Dodd, Mead & Company, New York:


    Rosina Emmet Sherwood (1854–1948) was an American painter. She may have received her earliest training in art from her mother; a sketchbook dating to 1873 was in the hands of family members in 1987. Rosina travelled to Europe in 1876–1877, and was presented to Queen Victoria during the trip.


    Rosina Emmet Sherwood

    Returning to New York, she and her friend Dora Wheeler began study with William Merritt Chase, and by 1881 she took studio space in the Tenth Street Studio Building. Among her earliest works were illustrations for publications such as “Harper’s Magazine,” and in 1880 she won the $1,000 first prize in a competition to design a Christmas card for Louis Prang & Company. Sherwood and Wheeler worked together in the design firm Associated Artists, run by Candace Wheeler, Dora's mother; they designed tapestries, curtains, and wallpaper. Subjects included a variety drawn from American literature. In 1884–1885 the women attended classes at the Académie Julian in Paris.


    A drawing by Sherwood is held in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. 











    Dodd, Mead and Company was one of the pioneer publishing houses of the United States, based in New York City. Under several names, the firm operated from 1839 until 1990. Dodd, Mead and Company was first established in New York City as the firm Taylor and Dodd.

    The founders of the company, Moses Woodruff Dodd and John S. Taylor, originally set out to publish religious books, with their first title published being Obligations of the World to the Bible, A Series of Lectures to Young Men (1839). In 1840, Dodd bought Taylor out of the young firm and continued to successfully publish alone for about thirty years. Dodd’s son Frank H. succeeded him in 1870. Frank H. would later be responsible for establishing The Bookman in 1895 and his work with The New International Encyclopedia in 1902, but before those successes, Dodd’s nephew Edward S. Mead became a partner in the firm. Shortly after the company was renamed Dodd and Mead, Bleecker Van Wagenen also became a partner. The firm was again renamed Dodd, Mead and Company and added a retail department in 1876.


    Through the 1890s and early 1900s Dodd, Mead and Company expanded publications to include a variety of British and American authors.






























































































































































    0 0

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.
    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 10 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1880 The Headlong Career and Wo(e)ful Ending of Precocious Piggy
    published by Griffith & Farran, London:



























    1880 The Little Pussy Cats
    published by Ward, Lock & Tyler, London:

    Ebenezer Ward and George Lock starting a publishing concern in 1854 which became known as "Ward and Lock". Based originally in Fleet Street, London, it outgrew its offices and in 1878 moved completely to Salisbury Square, London.


    Charles T. Tyler joined Ward and Lock as a partner in 1865 and the firm became Ward, Lock and Tyler. Tyler seems to have bought capital to the company and was a financial adviser. Tyler remained with the firm for eight years, ceasing to be a partner in 1873, when it title reverted to that of Ward and Lock.























    1880s Good-Night Stories for Little Folks:










































    1881 Buttercup's Visit to Little Stay-at-Home
    published by E.P. Dutton & Co., Boston, MA :

    E.P. Dutton was an American book publishing company founded as a book retailer in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1852 by Edward Payson Dutton.






















    1881 Golden Days of Childhood Picture Book:




























































    0 0
  • 06/01/18--05:49: Roy Lichtenstein - part 5


  • Roy Lichtenstein ( October 27, 1923 – September 29, 1997 ) was an American pop artist. During the 1960s, along with Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and James Rosenquist among others, he became a leading figure in the new art movement. His work defined the premise of pop art through parody. Inspired by the comic strip, Lichtenstein produced precise compositions that documented while they parodied, often in a tongue-in-cheek manner. His work was influenced by popular advertising and the comic book style. He described pop art as "not 'American' painting but actually industrial painting". His paintings were exhibited at the Leo Castelli Gallery in New York City.

    For a more detailed biography see part 1, and for earlier works see parts 1 - 4 also.

    This is part 5 of a 20-part series on the works of Roy Lichtenstein (works 1965-1966):



    1965 Blonde
    glazed ceramic 38.1 cm high

    1965 Ceramic Sculpture #2
    glazed ceramic 8.9 x 19.1 x 19.1 cm

    1965 Ceramic Sculpture #7
    painted and glazed ceramic 24.2 x 17.8 x 17.8 cm

    1965 Ceramic Sculpture #9
    glazed ceramic 26.7 cm high

    1965 Ceramic Sculpture #13
    painted and glazed ceramic 24.1 x 16.5 x 17.8 cm

    1965 Ceramic Sculpture #16
    painted and glazed ceramic 26 x 18.1 x 19.1 cm

    1965 Girl with Hair Ribbon
    oil and magna on canvas 121.9 x 121.9 cm

    1965 Grrrrrrrrrrr!!
    oil and magna on canvas 172.7 x 142.5 cm
    Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York

    1965 M-Maybe
    oil and magna on canvas 152.4 x 152.4 cm

    1965 Reverie
    screenprint on white wove paper 76.5 x 60.9 cm

    1965 Sweet Dreams Baby!
    screenprint on white wove paper 95.6 x 70.1 cm

    1965 This Must be the Place
    offset lithograph on paper 62.9 x 45.2 cm

    1965 Varoom
    oil and magma on canvas 91.4 x 91.4 cm

    1965-66 Explosion series:


    1965 Explosion
    oil and magna on canvas 142.2 x 121.9 cm

    1965 Explosion II
    enamel on steel 223.5 x 152.4 x 11.4 cm


    1965 Small Explosion ( Desk Explosion )
    enamel on steel 52.1 x 40.6 x 10.2 cm

    1965 Small Wall Explosion

    1965 Wall Explosion I
    porcelain enamel on steel 203.2 x 213.4 cm

    1965 Wall Explosion II
    enamel on steel 170.2 x 188 cm
     Tate, London

    1965 Wall Explosion II
    enamel on steel 212.7 x 194.9 cm

    1965 Wall Explosion III
    enamel on steel

    1965-66 Explosion
    lithograph on paper 56.2 x 43.5 cm
    Tate, London

    1966 Standing Explosion No. II ( Yellow ) 1

    1966 Standing Explosion No. II ( Yellow ) 2

    1965-66 Sunrise series:


    1965 Sunrise
    offset lithograph on lightweight, white wove paper 46.5 x 61.8 cm

    1965 Sunrise
    oil and magna on canvas 91.4 x 172.7 cm

    1965 Sunrise
    porcelain enamel on perforated steel 58.4 x 71.8 x 6.7 cm

    1965 Sunrise
    porcelain enamel on steel 21.6 x 27.9 cm

    1965 Sunrise
    porcelain enamel on steel 57.2 x 91.4 cm

    1965 Sunrise
    screenprint on silk 116.2 x 106 cm

    1966 Untitled ( Sunrise )
    Rowlux, printed paper on board 66 x 71.1 cm

    1965-66 Seascape series:


    1965 Untitled ( Seascape )
    Rowlux and printed paper 8.9 x 12.7 cm

    1965c Seascape
    oil and magna on canvas
    Private Collection

    1966 Azure Ocean Motion
    Rowlux with electric motor 47 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Blue Seascape
    oil and magna on canvas 61 x 91.4 cm

    1966 Electric Seascape #1
    Rowlux and photostat on board, and motorised lamp 57.2 x 71.1 cm

    1966 Electric Seascape #2
    wood, plastic, Rowlux, electric light and electric motor 57.4 x 71.6 cm

    1966 Golden Sand
    Rowlux, vinyl and paper on board 55.2 x 67.3 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 2
    Rowlux, acetate and vinyl and electric motor 66.7 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 3
    Rowlux and vinyl 67.3 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 4
    Rowlux and printed paper on board with electric motor 67.3 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 6
    Rowlux, vinyl and paper 67.3 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 7
    Rowlux, vinyl, paper and electric motor 57.2 x 67.3 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 8
    Rowlux, vinyl, paper and electric motor 67.3 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 9
    Rowlux and vinyl 47 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Kinetic Seascape 10
    Rowlux and vinyl with electric motor 47 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Ocean Motion ( Turquoise )
    Rowlux on board, and motor 57.2 x 67.3 cm

    1966 Ocean Motion
    Rowlux, plastic and cut-and-pasted printed paper on board, electric motor 57.2 x 66.7 cm

    1966 Photo Ocean Motion
    photograph, paper collage and electric motor 67.3 x 57.2 cm

    1966 Pink Sunset
    Rowlux and paper collage 67.9 x 55.2 cm

    1966 Seascape #13
    Rowlux and vinyl on board, originally with motorised lamp 55.9 x 71.1 cm

    1966 Seascape #15
    Rowlux on board, originally with motorised lamp 55.9 x 66 cm

    1966 Seascape #16
    Rowlux, Mylar and cut-and-pasted printed paper on board, motorised lamp 55.9 x 61 cm

    1966 Seascape #17
    Rowlux and cut-and-pasted printed paper on board, motorised lamp 55.9 x 68.6 cm

    1966 Seascape #18
    Rowlux on board, originally with motorised lamp 55.9 x 71.1 cm

    1966 Seascape #19
    Rowlux and cut-and-pasted painted and printed paper on board, motorised lamp 55.9 x 71.1 cm

    1966 Seascape #20
    Rowlux and vinyl on board, motorised lamp 57.5 x 62.5 cm

    1966 Seascape
    mixed media on paper 36.8 x 33 cm

    1966 Seascape
    Rowlux and vinyl on board

    1966 Seascape
    Rowlux, mylar, paper, and electric lamp 41.3 x 60.2 cm

    1966 Untitled ( Seascape )
    black and white paper on mounted Rowlux 49.5 x 55.2 cm

    1966 Untitled ( Seascape )
    Rowlux and paper on board 48.3 x 29.2 cm





    0 0

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.
    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 10 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1880 The Headlong Career and Wo(e)ful Ending of Precocious Piggy
    published by Griffith & Farran, London:




























    1880 The Little Pussy Cats
    published by Ward, Lock & Tyler, London:


    Ebenezer Ward and George Lock starting a publishing concern in 1854 which became known as "Ward and Lock". Based originally in Fleet Street, London, it outgrew its offices and in 1878 moved completely to Salisbury Square, London.


    Charles T. Tyler joined Ward and Lock as a partner in 1865 and the firm became Ward, Lock and Tyler. Tyler seems to have bought capital to the company and was a financial adviser. Tyler remained with the firm for eight years, ceasing to be a partner in 1873, when it title reverted to that of Ward and Lock.
























    1880s Good-Night Stories for Little Folks:











































    1881 Buttercup's Visit to Little Stay-at-Home
    published by E.P. Dutton & Co., Boston, MA :

    E.P. Dutton was an American book publishing company founded as a book retailer in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1852 by Edward Payson Dutton.























    1881 Golden Days of Childhood Picture Book:





























































    0 0

    This first series features books from between the 1850s to 1881.
    Books from between 1881 to 1904 will appear here later in the year.

    Until the mid-18th century, children's books mainly consisted of moralistic or enlightening stories propagating the religious and ethical view that hard work and diligence determines a person's life. Little consideration was given to children's reading pleasure.

    The focus in children's books gradually shifted from simple moral lessons to entertainment, with techniques of expression employed specifically for that purpose. Books carrying witty illustrations or exploring children's inner life also began to appear. The mid-19th century saw the development of girls' novels and narratives of family life.


    This is part 11 of an 11-part series on children's books 1850s - 1881:



    1881 My New Toy Book












































































    1881 The Decorative Sisters
    published by A.D.F. Randolph & Co., New York:

    Anson Davies Fitz Randolph and Arthur D. F. Randolph, were publishers at 91 and 93 Fifth Avenue, New York.





    Walter Satterlee ( 18 January 1844 – 28 May 1908 ) was an American figure and genre painter. He was born in Brooklyn New York. He graduated from Columbia University in 1863, studied in the National Academy of Design, and with Edwin White, in New York, and in 1878-1879 under Leon Bonnat in Paris. He first exhibited at the National Academy in 1868, was elected an associate of the Academy in 1879, and received its Thomas B. Clarke prize in 1886. He was a member of the American Watercolour Society and the New York Etching Club, and was an excellent teacher. Satterlee died in Brooklyn in 1908.



















































    1881 The May-Blossom or The Princess and her People illustrated by H.H. Emmerson
    published by Frederick Warne & Co., London:


















































































    0 0
  • 08/08/18--06:02: Piet Mondrian - part 1
  • Piet Mondrian in 1899

    Piet Mondrian was born Pieter Cornelis Mondriaan, Jr., on March 7, 1872, in Amersfoort, the Netherlands. He studied at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten, Amsterdam, from 1892 to 1897. Until 1908, when he began to take annual trips to Domburg in Zeeland, Mondrian’s work was naturalistic—incorporating successive on influences of academic landscape and still-life painting, Dutch Impressionism, and Symbolism. In 1909 a major exhibition of his work (with that of Jan Sluijters and Cornelis Spoor) was held at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, and that same year he joined the Theosophic Society. In 1909 and 1910 he experimented with Pointillism and by 1911 had begun to work in a Cubist mode. After seeing original Cubist works by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso at the first Moderne Kunstkring exhibition in 1911 in Amsterdam, Mondrian decided to move to Paris. There, from 1912 to 1914, he began to develop an independent abstract style.

    Mondrian was visiting the Netherlands when World War I broke out and prevented his return to Paris. During the war years in Holland, he further reduced his colours and geometric shapes and formulated his nonobjective Neoplastic style. In 1917 Mondrian became one of the founders of De Stijl. This group, which included Theo van Doesburg, Bart van der Leck, and Georges Vantongerloo, extended its principles of abstraction and simplification beyond painting and sculpture to architecture and graphic and industrial design. Mondrian’s essays on abstract art were published in the periodical De Stijl. In July 1919 he returned to Paris; there he exhibited with De Stijl in 1923, but withdrew from the group after van Doesburg reintroduced diagonal elements into his work around 1925. In 1930, Mondrian showed with Cercle et Carré (Circle and Square) and in 1931 joined Abstraction-Création.


    World War II forced Mondrian to move to London in 1938 and then to settle in New York in October 1940. In New York he joined American Abstract Artists and continued to publish texts on Neoplasticism. His late style evolved significantly in response to the city. In 1942 his first solo show took place at the Valentine Dudensing Gallery, New York. Mondrian died February 1, 1944, in New York.

    Biography from Guggenheim Museum, New York




    Note: Many pieces by Piet Mondrian have been omitted from this series as they are deemed to be held in copyright.


    This is part 1 of 9-part series on the works of Piet Mondrian:



    1890-92c Sheaves of Rye with Plough
    oil on cardboard 29 x 39 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1890c Dusk
    oil on canvas laid down on board 27.6 x 43.8 cm
    Private Collection

    1891 Basket with Apples
    oil on canvas 49.5 x 72.8 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1891 Dead Hare
    oil on canvas 80 x 51 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1891-92c Pitcher, Jug and Basket
    pastel on paper 62 x 75 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1892-94c Woman Peeling Potatoes
     oil on canvas 80 x 65 cm
    Private Collection

    1893 Still Life: Herring
    oil on canvas 66.5 x 77.5 cm
    Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

    1893-94c Warmth: Farm in the Achterhoek
    oil on canvas 63.5 x 75 cm

    1893-95 The Singel with Round Lutheran Church
    oil on canvas 69 x 46 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1894-95c Irrigation Ditch, Bridge and Goat
    watercolour on paper 49 x 66 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1894-96 Women doing the Wash
    oil on canvas 28.8 x 23.8 cm

    1894-96c Stream Bordered by Wooded Landscape
     oil on canvas laid down on board 28.5 x 37 cm
    Private Collection

    1895 Farmyard with Laundry and Logs
    watercolour on paper 29 x 45 cm
    Private Collection

    1895-96c Farm Building near Irrigation Ditch with Farmer at Work
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 30.5 x 39.4 cm
    Gutmann Gallery, Los Angeles, CA

    1895-96c Tree Trunks on Sloping Land
     oil on canvas 33 x 41 cm

    1895-96c Waals-Eilandgracht with Bridge and Flat Barges
    oil on paper laid down on panel 22.5 x 27.5 cm

    1895-98c The Broeker House
    oil on canvas 82 x71 cm
    Private Collection

    1895-1900c A House along the River Gein
    oil on panel 30.5 x 39.4 cm
     Private Collection

    1896 Young Princess
    oil on canvas 59.5 x 50 cm
    Paleis Het Loo, Nationaal Museum, Apeldoorn, Netherlands

    1897 Farmhouse
    oil on canvas 30.4 x 40.6 cm
     Private Collection

    1897 Farmhouse with Wash on the Line
    oil on cardboard 31.5 x 37.5 cm
     Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1897-98 Haystack and Farm Sheds in a Field
    oil on canvas 37 x 52 cm
     Private Collection

    1897-98 Haystack
    watercolour and gouache on paper 64 x 47 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1897-98c Farmstead along a Canal
     oil on canvas 34 x 52 cm

    1897-1907c Untitled ( River Landscape with Bridge )
    black chalk on postcard 8.6 x 13.3 cm

    1898-99 Farm Building with Haystack Viewed along the Horizon
    oil on paper 37 x 54 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands


    1898-99 Woman and Farm Building in the Achterhoek
     oil on paper 37 x 23 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898-99c Country Lane with Row of Workers' Houses
    oil on paper 39 x 29.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898-99c Drydock at Durgerdam
    watercolour on paper 63 x 84 cm
    Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minnesota

    1898-99c Farm Buildings in an Achterhoek Village
    oil on panel laid down on cardboard 32 x 46.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898-99c Houses and Paltrok Mill on the Voorweg
    oil on canvas laid down on board 27.6 x 38.5 cm
    Private Collection

    1898-99c Rear Gables of Achterhoek Farm
    oil on canvas 33 x 45 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898-99c The Boerenwetering with Shed of the Royal Wax Candle Factory
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 33 x 43 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898-99c Three Cows in a Pot Stall
    watercolour on paper 39.5 x 66 cm
    Private Collection

    1898-99c Two Girls in a Wood
    oil on paper laid down on cardboard 27.3 x 37.9 cm
    Musée Départemental du Prieuré, Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France

    1898-1900c Female Torso in Profile with Book
    watercolour on paper 89 x 50 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898-1900c Seated Woman with Arms Crossed
    watercolour on paper 59.5 x 44.7 cm

    1898c Lange Bleekerssloot with Barge
    oil on canvas laid down on panel 38.5 x 53 cm
    Private Collection

    1898c Lange Bleekerssloot: View toward the Kostverlorenvaart 
    oil on canvas laid down on panel 50.8 x 67.3 cm

    1898c St. Jacob's Church, Winterswijk
    gouache on paper 75 x 50 cm
     Rijksmueum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    1898c Three Italian Poplars and Buildings
    oil on canvas laid down on panel

    1898c Wingless Paltrok Mill in the Schinkelbuurt
    oil on canvas 31 x 38.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1898c Yellow Chrysanthemums in a Ginger Pot
    oil on canvas 42 x 34.5 cm

    1899 On the Lappenbrink, Winterswijk
    gouache on paper 128 x 99 cm
    Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

    1899 Portrait of a Girl
    charcoal on paper 51.8 x 41 cm
    Private Collection

    1899 Still Life with Oranges
    48 x 32 cm
    Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    1899 The Weaver's House
    gouache on paper 42.5 x 55.9 cm

    1899-1900c White Roses
    oil on canvas 46.5 x 24 cm
    Private Collection

    1899c Amsterdam Skyline Viewed from the West
    watercolour, gouache, and fabricated black chalk, with erasures, on cream wove paper 39.9 x 58.8 cm
    Art Institute of Chicago, IL

    1899c At Work ( aka In the Fields )
    watercolour and gouache 54 x 79 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1899c Farm Building with Bridge
    oil on canvas 33.3 x 43.8 cm
     Private Collection

    1899c Farm Scene with St. Jacob's Church
    watercolour and gouache on paper 53 x 65 cm
     Private Collection


    0 0
  • 08/14/18--06:26: Piet Mondrian - part 2
  • Self-Portrait c1900
    oil on canvas 50.8 x 39.4 cm
    The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC

    Piet Mondrian was the leading artist of the 'De Stijl' (the style) movement, a group of Dutch artists who produced strictly geometric, abstract art. Mondrian's early work painted from nature became increasingly abstract. For example a series of studies of trees and their branches made from 1909 to 1913 evolved into a criss-cross of lines. However it was when he became a member of the Theosophist group that he began to paint the grid paintings with which he is associated. Theosophists saw existence in terms of harmony between male and female, positive and negative, horizontal and vertical. Mondrian's paintings embody this sense of balance. 

    Note: Many pieces by Piet Mondrian have been omitted from this series as they are deemed to be held in copyright.


    For a broader biography and for earlier works by Mondrian, see part 1 also.
    This is part 2 of 9-part series on the works of Piet Mondrian:



    1899c Farmyard with Carriage Barn in the Achterhoek
    oil on canvas 32.8 x 38.2 cm
    The Sidney Janis Family Collections, New York

    1899c Fields with Stacked Sheaves of Rye
    oil on canvas 45.4 x 58.8 cm
     Private Collection

    1899c Stadhouderskade
    oil on canvas 40 x 61 cm
    The Judith Rothschild Foundation, New York

    1899c Wood with Beech Trees
    watercolour and gouache on paper 45.5 x 57 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1900 House on the Gein
    watercolour and gouache on paper 46 x 57 cm
     Private Collection

    1900 Irrigation Ditch with Young Pollarded Willow
    oil on canvas 23.5 x 37.5 cm Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1900 Irrigation Ditch with Young Pollarded Willow
    watercolour on paper 43 x 62 cm
    Private Collection

    1900 Still Life: Apples, Pot with Flowers and Metal Pan
     oil on canvas 94 x 68 cm
    Private Collection

    1900 Upright Chrysanthemum against a Brownish Ground
    watercolour on paper 36.8 x 22.9 cm
    The Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis

    1900-01 The Royal Wax Candle Factory
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 35 x 48 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1900-01 Young Child
    oil on canvas 53 x 44 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1900-02c Farm Scene with Tree in the Foreground and Irrigation Ditch
    oil on canvas 38 x 47.5 cm
    Private Collection

    1900-02c Irrigation Ditch with Mature Willow
    oil on board 25 x 29 cm
    Private Collection

    1900c Irrigation Ditch with Two Willows
     oil on canvas 28.5 x 28.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1900c Triangulated Farmhouse Facade with Polder in Blue
    watercolour and gouache on paper 45.5 x 58.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1901 Upright Chrysanthemum against a Blue-Grey Ground
    watercolour on paper 38.3 x 19.3 cm
    Stichting Historische Verzamelingen van het Huis Oranje-Nassau, The Hague, Netherlands

    1901-02 Evening on the Weesperzijde
    crayon, watercolour and gouache 55 x 66 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1901-02 Farmyard in Het Gooi Flanked by Saplings
     oil on canvas 30.3 x 43 cm

    1901-02c Fragment of an Irrigation Ditch
    oil on canvas 31 x 26.5 cm

    1901-02c Free Impression of a Polder Landscape
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 29 x 36.5 cm
    Gebr. Douwes Fine Art, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    1901-02c Polder Landscape with Group of Five Cows
    oil on paper laid down on panel 33 x 38.4 cm
    Private Collection

    1901-02c Shaded Irrigation Ditch
    watercolour on paper
    Private Collection

    1901c Passion Flower
    watercolour on paper 72 x 47 cm
     Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1902 Bleachworks on the Gein
    watercolour on paper 48 x 59 cm

    1902 Near Arnheim
    watercolour on paper 47.5 x 66 cm

    1902 On the Ringdijk, Watergraafsmeer
    oil on canvas laid down on board 27.5 x 50.5 cm
    Joseph M.B. Guttmann Galleries, Los Angeles, CA

    1902 Vinken Bridge at Diemen
     oil on canvas 52 x 36.1 cm
    Private Collection

    1902-03 Oostzijdse Mill with Woman at Dock of Landzicht Farm
    oil on canvas 61 x 76.8 cm
    Private Collection

    1902-03 Still Life with a Plaster Bust
    oil on canvas 73.5 x 61.5 cm
    Groninger Museum, Groningen, Netherlands

    1902-03c Farmhouse along the Water Shielded by Arch of Trees
    oil on canvas 30.2 x 40 cm
     Private Collection

    1902-03c Landzicht Farm Viewed from Downstream with Horizontal Format
    oil on canvas  30 x 36 cm

    1902-03c or earlier Truncated View of the Broekzijder Mill on the Gein, Wings Facing West
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 30.2 x 38.1 cm
    Museum of Modern Art, New York

    1902-03c Willow Grove, Trunks Leaning Left I
    oil on canvas 40.5 x 60.3 cm
    Centraal Museum, Utrecht on loan from Stichting Van Baaren Museum

    1902-05 Young Tree Grove Amidst Water Reflections
    watercolour on paper 30.3 x 39.7 cm
    Dallas Museum of Art, Texas
    © 2012 Mondrian / Holtzman Trust c/o HCR International Washington, DC

    1902-05c Blossoming Trees before a Haystack
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 28 x 24 cm
     Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1902c Curved Irrigation Ditch Bordering Farmyard with Flowering Trees
    oil on canvas 50 x 68.5 cm


    1903 On the Land, Oil Study
    oil on cardboard 30.5 x 38 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1903 Oostzijdse Mill by Moonlight
    63 x 75.4 cm
    Rijksmusem, Amsterdam, Netherlands

    1903c Farmstead with Willows on the Water III
    oil on canvas 62.5 x 75 cm

    1903c Tip-up Bridge in a Meadow
    oil on canvas 21.5 x 28 cm
    Private Collection

    1904 Barn Doors of a Brabant Farm Building
    oil on cardboard laid down on panel 33 x 43 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1904 Brabant Farm Building and Shed
    oil on canvas 40 x 48.2 cm
    Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin, Ohio

    1904 Brabant Farm Building with Pump
    oil on board 31.9 x 36.1 cm
    Private Collection

    1904 Farm Building at Nistelrode II
    watercolour on paper 41.5 x 62 cm

    1904 Kitchen Interior
    watercolour on paper 51 x 65 cm
    Private Collection

    1904 Landscape near Uden
    oil on canvas 44 x 52 cm
    Private Collection

    1904 Near the Ox Stall, Hilvarenbeek
     oil on cardboard laid down on panel 30.5 x 38 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1904 Post Mill at Heeswijk, Rear View
    oil on paper laid down on canvas 36 x 26 cm
    Noorbrabants Museum,'s-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands

    1904 Study of Two Cows
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 31.5 x 41.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1905 Isar Harlemia
    oil on canvas 45 x 35 cm
     Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1905 Landscape at Loosduinen
    black chalk ( and water ), watercolour and gouache 25.8 x 35.9 cm
    The Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio

    1905 Landzicht Farm under Bluish-Grey Sky
    watercolour on paper 38.5 x 61 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1905 The White Bull Calf
    oil on canvas laid down on panel 31.5 x 39 cm

    1905 The White Bull Calf
    watercolour on paper 44.5 x 58.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands


    0 0
  • 08/17/18--08:37: Piet Mondrian - part 3
  • 1918 Self-Portrait
    oil on canvas 88 x 71 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    Piet Mondrian was the leading artist of the 'De Stijl' (the style) movement, a group of Dutch artists who produced strictly geometric, abstract art. Mondrian's early work painted from nature became increasingly abstract. For example a series of studies of trees and their branches made from 1909 to 1913 evolved into a criss-cross of lines. However it was when he became a member of the Theosophist group that he began to paint the grid paintings with which he is associated. Theosophists saw existence in terms of harmony between male and female, positive and negative, horizontal and vertical. Mondrian's paintings embody this sense of balance. 

    Note: Many pieces by Piet Mondrian have been omitted from this series as they are deemed to be held in copyright.


    For a broader biography see part 1 also. For earlier works by Mondrian, see parts 1 - 2 also.

    This is part 3 of 9-part series on the works of Piet Mondrian:


    1905-16 Farm at Duivendrecht:


    1905-06 Farm at Duivendrecht
     chalk, watercolour and gouache on tinted paper 50 x 65.5 cm
    Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands

    1905-06c Farm at Duivendrecht
    oil on canvas 46 x 59 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1916c Farm in Duivendrecht at Evening
    oil on canvas
    Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, Netherlands

    1916c Farm near Duivendrecht
    oil on canvas 86.3 x 107.9 cm
    Art Institute of Chicago, IL

    1916c Farm Near Duivendrecht, in the Evening
    ( reprise of a compositional series from 1905–1908 )
    oil on canvas 80 x 106 cm
    © Dallas Museum of Art, Texas


    1905-06c Geinrust Farm with Isolated Tree at Left
    oil on canvas laid down on cardboard 31.2 x 38.7 cm

    1905-06c Geinrust Farm with Isolated Tree
    oil on canvas 47.2 x 63.5 cm
    Private Collection

    1905-06c Geinrust Farm with Two Cows at the Water's Edge
    watercolour on paper 49.5 x 66 cm
     Private Collection

    1905-07 Geinrust Farm with Saplings
    watercolour on paper 31 x 41 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands

    1905-07 Geinrust Farm with Truncated Tall Trees and Saplings
    oil on canvas 37 x 55 cm
    Private Collection


    1905-07 Farmstead with Long Row of Trees on the Gein
    watercolour on paper 51 x 74 cm

    1905-07 Stammer Mill with Streaked Sky
     oil on canvas 74.6 x 96.5 cm


    1905c Apple Trees and Chickens in a Farmyard
    oil on canvas 49 x 68.5 cm
    Gemeentemuseum Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands